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A modest question

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From:
Austin Hastings
Date:
January 6, 2004 22:20
Subject:
A modest question
Message ID:
ICELKKFHGNOHCNCCCBKFMEDNCJAA.Austin_Hastings@Yahoo.com

Larry, chromatic, Allison, Damian, et al:

What's the big fascination with traits?

I read the paper, and at the end where they talked about refactoring the
Smalltalk class library, they managed to claim 12% fewer lines of code:

> In total, these classes use 46 different traits and implement 509 methods,
> whereof 36 are automatically generated accessor methods. This is just over
> 5% fewer methods than in the original implementation. In addition, the
code
> for the trait implementation is 12% smaller than the original.

However, the authors continue to report:

> This is especially remarkable because 10% of the methods in the original
> implementation are implemented “too high” in the hierarchy specifically to
> enable code sharing. With inheritance, the penalty for this is the
repeated
> need to cancel inherited behaviour (using methods that cause a runtime
> error) in subclasses where they do not make sense. In the trait
> implementation, there is no need to resort to this tactic.

Which I interpret as meaning that the "artificially high" code-sharing
implementations have caused extra lines of code in lower level classes. So
the "12%" figure is inclusive of deliberate pessimization that has been done
to substitute clarity for compactness -- presumably "native" code that
hasn't been evolved so much would have more compactness, less redundant
code, and would yield less than 12% improvement by refactoring into the
traits model.

So on the grand balance of utility, what are the metrics that traits are
supposed to help improve? The 10% reduction of LOC reminds me of the old
Assembler rule of thumb: do it last, you'll get 10% faster.

Presumably there are some other metrics being improved. Can one or more of
you explain what the perceived improvements, and what's the order of
significance? That is, give us a 1. 2. 3. list?

Thanks,

=Austin


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