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Re: Elevator pitch, deprecating $a/$b sort globals by using sub{}

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From:
Smylers
Date:
July 6, 2021 09:49
Subject:
Re: Elevator pitch, deprecating $a/$b sort globals by using sub{}
Message ID:
20210706094842.GE5311@stripey.com
Nicholas Clark writes:

> On Sun, Jul 04, 2021 at 05:40:09PM +0200, Martijn Lievaart wrote:
> 
> >     sort sub($a,$b){ $a->{x} <=> $b->{x} } @list
> 
> The first thing that thought was that this makes sort special,
> compared with the other builtins that take blocks (map, grep)
> 
> But those take one implicit argument, for which $_ works just fine.
> 
> Our problem here is that sort needs two implicit arguments.

Does it?

I mean, yes, obviously at the moment a sort routine requires two
arguments. But how common is it for those not to be duplicates of each
other? That is, in:

    sort { f($a) <=> g($b) } @list

f() and g() are overwhelmingly identical operations. And if either of
them are involved, it's irksome to have to duplicate the operation on
both sides:

    sort { lc "$a->{somefield}->@*" cmp lc "$b->{somefeild}->@*" } @list

[Ooops — typo in the second hash key!]

If we're looking at re-doing sort, it might be worth considering whether
this repetition can be avoided, rather than just at different ways of
specifying it.

Sort needs to know:

1.  How to transform an item into a key to use for comparison.
2.  Whether to compare with <=> or cmp.
3.  Whether the output should be ascending or descending.

So instead of $a and $b, a sort routine could be specified with $_ and
an indication of whether to use <=> or cmp.

One possible design (to show the concept; I'm not suggesting
specifically this):

    asort { lc "$_->{somefield}->@*" } @list

    reverse nsort { $_->{age} } @list

That is:

1.  A single (optional) block takes $_ and returns the sort key.
2.  Comparison operator specified with the function name — cos this
    seems less messy than trying to force it into an argument somewhere.
3.  Ascending by default; reverse is available for occasions where
    descending is required.

And it gets rid of $a and $b.

Smylers



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