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[perl #22011] [PATCH] pod/perlmod.pod (v5.8.0)

From:
Chris Pepper
Date:
April 22, 2003 07:46
Subject:
[perl #22011] [PATCH] pod/perlmod.pod (v5.8.0)
Message ID:
rt-22011-55473.11.0523590303906@bugs6.perl.org
# New Ticket Created by  Chris Pepper 
# Please include the string:  [perl #22011]
# in the subject line of all future correspondence about this issue. 
# <URL: http://rt.perl.org/rt2/Ticket/Display.html?id=22011 >


	Reading the docs, I found a few typos and language problems. 
Suggested patch follows. If I should submit this differently, please 
advise.


						Thank you,


						Chris Pepper

--- perlmod.pod	Sun Jun  9 12:50:22 2002
+++ perlmod.pod.fixed	Mon Apr 21 20:05:08 2003
@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
  in part because it's more readable to B<emacs> macros.  It also makes C++
  programmers feel like they know what's going on--as opposed to using the
  single quote as separator, which was there to make Ada programmers feel
-like they knew what's going on.  Because the old-fashioned syntax is still
+like they knew what was going on.  Because the old-fashioned syntax is still
  supported for backwards compatibility, if you try to use a string like
  C<"This is $owner's house">, you'll be accessing C<$owner::s>; that is,
  the $s variable in package C<owner>, which is probably not what you meant.
@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@
  are either local to the current package, or must be fully qualified
  from the outer package name down.  For instance, there is nowhere
  within package C<OUTER> that C<$INNER::var> refers to
-C<$OUTER::INNER::var>.  It would treat package C<INNER> as a totally
+C<$OUTER::INNER::var>.  C<INNER> refers to a totally
  separate global package.

  Only identifiers starting with letters (or underscore) are stored
@@ -53,7 +53,7 @@
  C<main>, including all punctuation variables, like $_.  In addition,
  when unqualified, the identifiers STDIN, STDOUT, STDERR, ARGV,
  ARGVOUT, ENV, INC, and SIG are forced to be in package C<main>,
-even when used for other purposes than their built-in one.  If you
+even when used for other purposes than their built-in ones.  If you
  have a package called C<m>, C<s>, or C<y>, then you can't use the
  qualified form of an identifier because it would be instead interpreted
  as a pattern match, a substitution, or a transliteration.
@@ -76,7 +76,7 @@
  from).  See L<perldebug>.

  The special symbol C<__PACKAGE__> contains the current package, but cannot
-(easily) be used to construct variables.
+(easily) be used to construct variable names.

  See L<perlsub> for other scoping issues related to my() and local(),
  and L<perlref> regarding closures.
@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@
  being blown out of the water by a signal--you have to trap that yourself
  (if you can).)  You may have multiple C<END> blocks within a file--they
  will execute in reverse order of definition; that is: last in, first
-out (LIFO).  C<END> blocks are not executed when you run perl with the
+out (LIFO).  C<END> blocks are not executed when you run Perl with the
  C<-c> switch, or if compilation fails.

  Inside an C<END> subroutine, C<$?> contains the value that the program is
@@ -314,7 +314,7 @@
  a Perl package with the same name as the file.  It is specifically
  designed to be reusable by other modules or programs.  It may do this
  by providing a mechanism for exporting some of its symbols into the
-symbol table of any package using it.  Or it may function as a class
+symbol table of any package using it, or it may function as a class
  definition and make its semantics available implicitly through
  method calls on the class and its objects, without explicitly
  exporting anything.  Or it can do a little of both.
@@ -461,7 +461,7 @@
  because it determines module availability at compile time, not in the
  middle of your program's execution.  An exception would be if two modules
  each tried to C<use> each other, and each also called a function from
-that other module.  In that case, it's easy to use C<require>s instead.
+that other module.  In that case, it's easy to use C<require> instead.

  Perl packages may be nested inside other package names, so we can have
  package names containing C<::>.  But if we used that package name
@@ -481,11 +481,12 @@

  =head2 Making your module threadsafe

-Perl has since 5.6.0 support for a new type of threads called
-interpreter threads. These threads can be used explicitly and implicitly.
+Snce 5.6.0, Perl has had support for a new type of threads called
+interpreter threads ('ithreads). These threads can be used explicitly
+and implicitly.

  Ithreads work by cloning the data tree so that no data is shared
-between different threads. These threads can be used using the threads
+between different threads. These threads can be used by using the threads
  module or by doing fork() on win32 (fake fork() support). When a
  thread is cloned all Perl data is cloned, however non-Perl data cannot
  be cloned automatically.  Perl after 5.7.2 has support for the C<CLONE>




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